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Factors influencing academic outcomes in blended learning environments: A pilot study on the role of self-regulated learning THESIS

, Trent University , Canada

Trent University . Awarded

Abstract

The growth of online technologies and their incorporation into learning environments is based on the expectation that a blended learning environment will substantially improve students' learning outcomes. However, very little is known about the motivational, cognitive, and behavioural self-regulation attributes that may contribute to student success in blended learning. Using a social cognitive view of self-regulated learning as a theoretical framework (Pintrich, 1999, 2004; Zimmerman, 1989, 1998, & 2002), the present study examined the relations between students self-regulation attributes and their academic outcomes in a blended learning course that provided the webcast recording of the face-to-face lectures, and online access to weekly quizzes, course assignments and question/discussion boards. Additionally, this study examined whether webcast viewing was associated with students' academic outcomes in the course.

A small, but significant positive correlation was found between students' overall viewing times and their academic outcomes in the course. Students were more likely to view the webcasts either immediately after the weekly lecture or on the days immediately preceding their scheduled exam in the course. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that effort regulation, self-efficacy, time and environment management, and overall viewing time had significant associations with students' final grades. Students with low self-regulation skills could benefit from webcasts as long as this they ignore environmental distractions and direct their efforts to the task at hand.

Citation

Hejazifar, N. Factors influencing academic outcomes in blended learning environments: A pilot study on the role of self-regulated learning. Master's thesis, Trent University. Retrieved October 23, 2017 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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