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The second digital divide and its effect on African-American (K-12) school-age children DISSERTATION

, University of Phoenix, United States

University of Phoenix . Awarded

Abstract

The qualitative phenomenological study explored the perceptions of educators and parents of African-American (K-12) school-age children on how the children were using technology. The study was conducted in the Memphis City Public School System (MCS) and was limited to three schools in a school district. Common themes emerged from the analysis of the participant’s responses. A purposeful sample of 15 educators and parents provided additional understanding on how African-American (K-12) school-age children are using technology. Five open-ended interview questions were asked during the study. The questions were (a) how much time does your student or child spend on the computer; (b) what do you see your student or child doing on the computer; (c) do you have rules regarding computer use and if so, what are they; (d) does your student or child ever seek your assistance on the computer and if so, what for; and (e) where does your student or child access the Internet? Common themes derived from the study on how African-American (K-12) school-age children were using technology. The study revealed that (a) most students and children spend an hour a day or two to three hours per week using the computer; (b) most students and children do curriculum-related activities and homework on the computer; (c) rules regarding computer use usually involve doing only the assigned work and restriction to other sites; (d) most students and children ask for computer assistance in terms of formatting concerns; (e) according to the educators, most students can access the Internet via the library; and (f) according to the parents, most of the children have Internet access in the homes.

Citation

Barrett, C.A. The second digital divide and its effect on African-American (K-12) school-age children. Ph.D. thesis, University of Phoenix. Retrieved October 23, 2017 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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