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Disciplining television: Ideology as read through high school distance learning videos
DISSERTATION

, The University of Alabama, United States

The University of Alabama . Awarded

Abstract

Video is a powerful carrier of meaning and one of the common components of distance learning programs. Although much research has been conducted on the instrumental effectiveness of video in distance learning to support academic achievement, such video simultaneously suggests many meanings which are inadequately understood. In this study I examine the video of high school distance learning programs through the methodological framework of television criticism and the theoretical framework of critically inflected semiotics. I treat conventional television and education as two competing discourses, both problematic in the power imbalance in which they place viewers and students. Through a textual reading of the videos, I look for the manner and extent to which they rely on either discourse, and the political implications for viewers (students). Finally, I suggest a model of video production that addresses with a measure of equity the power dynamics found in the practice of distance learning.

Citation

Cook, T.M. Disciplining television: Ideology as read through high school distance learning videos. Ph.D. thesis, The University of Alabama. Retrieved December 7, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords