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Information technology: An assessment of the unique factors leading to IT adoption and use in a developing country
DISSERTATION

, Vanderbilt University, United States

Vanderbilt University . Awarded

Abstract

This empirical study investigates the use of Computer-Based Communication represented by Email at the University of Bahrain. It investigates (a) whether the students use Email, and if so, for what purposes and to what extent, and (b) the important factors in individual's adoption and utilization of Email at the University of Bahrain.

A cross-sectional survey of 1,109 students at the University of Bahrain was conducted in the summer of 2002. Professors handed questionnaires to students in each of the five schools within the University of Bahrain. This study integrates Rogers' diffusion of innovation model through the perceived attributes of innovation plus contextual factors.

The results of the study showed (a) the majority of students in the University of Bahrain use Computer-Based Communication to an extent, but not often for academic use, and (b) there is a relationship between most of the contextual independent variables derived for this research and the extent of use.

Adoption of Email at the University of Bahrain reflected grass-roots, home-based, bottom-up, individuals choosing to use it for their own purposes rather than top-down, centrally promoted, institutional initiative. Concerns at the outset that traditional culture would retard adoption of Email seem mostly unfounded. If anything, Email succeeded despite lagging leadership and weak institutional endorsement.

Regression analysis shows that relative advantage, complexity, management support, knowledge/awareness, and previous experience were all supported. Contrary to the theory, compatibility, subjective norm, and self-efficacy were not related.

Citation

Al-Jalahma, D.R. Information technology: An assessment of the unique factors leading to IT adoption and use in a developing country. Ph.D. thesis, Vanderbilt University. Retrieved November 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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