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Is video modeling enough to teach parent-child interactions? Toward a systematic evaluation of the key components of video modeling
THESIS

, University of North Texas, United States

University of North Texas . Awarded

Abstract

Parent-child interactions help set the foundation for a child’s development. It is therefore important to investigate the relative efficiency and efficacy of procedures used to train them. One procedure that researchers continue to explore is video modeling. The current study evaluated the effect of a video model that displayed favorable parent-child interactions and a modified model with embedded instructions to determine if the introduction of either of these models would alter parent-child interactions. Both models were presented alone without supplemental guidance. Three families were involved in the study. The results showed no systematic change across families or conditions as a result of video viewing and are discussed within context of the needs of the parent, adequate stimulus control, community to support behavior change, measurement sensitivity, and influence of methodology. This study provided a great baseline for future studies to explore the necessary components to create an effective video model.

Citation

Whaley-Carr, A.M. Is video modeling enough to teach parent-child interactions? Toward a systematic evaluation of the key components of video modeling. Master's thesis, University of North Texas. Retrieved November 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords