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Dance online: Can the students still follow the steps? A rationale for online delivery methods in Dance.0 DISSERTATION

, Idaho State University, United States

Idaho State University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to design an online section of a university level general education dance course, and to determine if the effectiveness of the online delivery was at least equal to that of the face-to-face delivery as measured by student achievement on examinations. To accomplish this, the goals were: (1) to present evidence that the students' achievement outcomes within an online dance course were at least equal to that of the face-to-face course, (2) to assure that a newly developed online dance course could meet the standards of instructional quality, and (3) to seek expert opinion in the use of the ADDIE instructional design model.

The creation of the four course modules was guided by key pedagogical concerns of social interaction and reflective collaboration in learning environments. This study examined whether quality instruction in a university dance program could be met through online course methods that promoted reflective and collaborative learning environments. There were two sections of this course, one experimental group (online) and one control group (face-to-face), delivered over a 16-week semester at a southeast Idaho public university.

The ADDIE instructional design model was utilized to guide the creation of the online technology-based course and a modified Delphi technique was used to determine the effectiveness of the ADDIE model through expert opinion from a qualified panel of SMEs and IDEs. Student opinions (attitudes) of online teaching effectiveness (quality) were assessed through the administration of the Student Evaluation of Online Teaching Effectiveness (SEOTE), along with a researcher-adapted course evaluation survey, the Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness (SETE). This research utilized a quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design.

Results from the data analysis indicated there was no statistically significant difference in student achievement between students enrolled in the online-technology-based section and those in the face-to-face section; there was no statistically significant perceived difference in the quality of instruction between students enrolled in the online section and those in the face-to-face section as measured by the SEOTE and SETE; and, the development of the online course met the ADDIE criteria as validated by SMEs and IDEs through the Delphi technique.

Citation

Zimmerly, L.C. Dance online: Can the students still follow the steps? A rationale for online delivery methods in Dance.0. Ph.D. thesis, Idaho State University. Retrieved October 17, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Cited By

  1. Online Course Development Using the ADDIE Instruction Design Model: The Need to Establish Validity

    Jane Strickland, Idaho State University, United States; Albert Strickland, Idaho State University (retired), United States; Paohsi Wang, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, Taiwan; Lauralee Zimmerly & Shane Moulton, Idaho State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (Mar 25, 2013) pp. 2651–2658

  2. The Delphi Technique as an Evaluation Tool: An Example of Developing an E-Learning Curriculum using the ADDIE Model

    Jane Strickland & Shane Moulton, Idaho State University, United States; Al Strickland, Idaho State University (retired), United States; Jerry White, Federal Bureau of Investigation (retired), United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2010 (Oct 18, 2010) pp. 2203–2211

  3. Online Course Development Using the ADDIE Model of Instruction Design: The Need to Establish Validity in the Analysis Phase

    Shane Moulton & Jane Strickland, Idaho State University, United States; Al Strickland, Idaho State University (retired), United States; Jerry White, Federal Bureau of Investigation (retired), United States; Lauralee Zimmerly, Idaho State University, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2010 (Oct 18, 2010) pp. 2046–2054

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