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The effects of video-based self-modeling and video-based peer modeling on reading fluency in elementary-aged students with reading delays
DISSERTATION

, The University of Memphis, United States

The University of Memphis . Awarded

Abstract

The effects of a video-based self-modeling intervention and a video-based peer-modeling intervention to increase oral reading fluency in elementary students with reading delays was examined in a single subject, multiple baseline study. Nine students in third, fourth and fifth grades, at least one year below grade level in reading competencies, who received reading instruction in a special education resource room setting and participated throughout the remainder of the day in a general classroom setting, were the participants in the study. Three students in third grade, 3 students in fourth grade, and 3-students in fifth grade were randomly selected to receive intervention or be in a comparison group. Two interventions were employed: a self-modeling videotape of fluent reading, and a peer-modeling videotape of fluent reading. Students in the comparison group received no intervention. Each of the nine participants read a 3-minute passage twice a week, on nonconsecutive days, at their instructional reading level to determine reading fluency, using Curriculum-Based Measures (CBM), of words read correctly per minute (WCPM). This continued throughout the three phases of the study: baseline, intervention, and follow up. The study took place in a rural elementary school in Appalachia. Results indicated increases in oral reading fluency rates for all students, with the greatest increase being in the students receiving Video-based Self-modeling intervention.

Citation

Decker, M.M. The effects of video-based self-modeling and video-based peer modeling on reading fluency in elementary-aged students with reading delays. Ph.D. thesis, The University of Memphis. Retrieved April 18, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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