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When self-pacing goes wrong: A comparison of two methods for reducing computer-based racing
DISSERTATION

, Western Michigan University, United States

Western Michigan University . Awarded

Abstract

Self-pacing, although often seen as one of the primary benefits of computer-based instruction (CBI), can also result in an important problem, namely, computer-based racing. Computer-based racing is when learners respond so quickly within CBI that mistakes are made, even on well-known material. This study compared traditional CBI with two forms of CBI designed to reduce computer-based racing: incentives/disincentives and postfeedback delays. All three formats were evaluated in terms of both performance and satisfaction using a between group repeated measures design with pretest and posttest. Dependent measures included posttest scores, satisfaction questionnaire ratings, percentage correct during learning, and total training time. Posttest scores favored the use of postfeedback delays to improve learning over incentives/disincentives and control conditions. Postfeedback delays negatively affected satisfaction in comparison to the control condition, although no satisfaction differences were found between incentives/disincentives and postfeedback delays.

Citation

Johnson, D.A. When self-pacing goes wrong: A comparison of two methods for reducing computer-based racing. Ph.D. thesis, Western Michigan University. Retrieved August 24, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords