You are here:

Players as knowledge producers and learners: Emergent culture, enculturation, and expertise in massively multiplayer online games
THESIS

, York University , Canada

York University . Awarded

Abstract

The Internet has provided video game players with a platform for generating and sharing knowledge and resources with others in their game communities. This thesis speculates on the knowledge and understandings that players in a massively multiplayer online game (MMOG) produce and consume as they gain expertise through the game, and how this knowledge is propagated to enculturate other players into the social practices of gameplay. As a player as well as an observer, I document my experiences at the intersection of emergent culture, enculturation, and expertise in the context of the game and provide evidence on how these three elements are intricately connected. My findings suggest that various resources and artifacts are generated by players to set standards and requirements for "good" or "normal" play. My results support that player-produced knowledge and understandings influence the gaming experience for all those who participate in the game worlds.

Citation

Chu, S.N.M. Players as knowledge producers and learners: Emergent culture, enculturation, and expertise in massively multiplayer online games. Master's thesis, York University. Retrieved November 15, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords