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The perception of Web 2.0 technologies on teaching and learning in higher education: A case study
DISSERTATION

, Capella University, United States

Capella University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine faculty members` perception of Web 2.0 technologies on teaching and learning in higher education compared to traditional classroom teaching methods in programs at a higher education institutions to establish if relationships prevailed in their delivery of courses through the use of Web 2.0 technologies compared with traditional classroom delivery of courses; their overall satisfaction; the level of faculty development programs available; and their perceived effectiveness and impact of faculty development and issues and barriers affecting technology integration. This study also examined the influence of gender, age, and employment status on faculty members` perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies on teaching and learning in higher education compared to traditional classroom teaching methods. This study used a nonexperimental, quantitative descriptive research design to investigate faculty members` perception of Web 2.0 technologies on teaching and learning in higher education compared to traditional classroom teaching methods. Participants for this study included full-time and part-time faculty members teaching at a public university in the United States. The results indicated that there is a relationship between faculty members` perception of teaching college courses utilizing Web 2.0 technologies versus traditional classroom method; there is a relationship between faculty members` gender and perception regarding their use of Web 2.0 technologies in their courses; and there was a relationship between faculty members` age and perception regarding their use of Web 2.0 technologies in their courses.

Citation

Zelick, S.A. The perception of Web 2.0 technologies on teaching and learning in higher education: A case study. Ph.D. thesis, Capella University. Retrieved October 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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