You are here:

Electronic mail: An investigation of the relationship between computer self-efficacy and teachers' use of computer technology for e-mail communication
DISSERTATION

, Capella University, United States

Capella University . Awarded

Abstract

The rapid expansion of technology has affected every organization within the United States. Many employees are expected to access their technology to increase efficiency and communication. Within the educational system the vast majority of time-stretched teachers have the opportunity to use e-mail as an efficient medium for communication. Despite access to desktop technology many teachers use their computer for communication purposes to a lesser degree than would be expected. The national survey conducted by Teaching, Learning and Computing (1998) found that only 16% of American teachers conduct e-mail conversations with other teachers. Possible explanations for nominal use might include lack of self-efficacy or confidence in relation to computer use. According to Bandura (1997) self-efficacy beliefs can powerfully influence the level of accomplishment that one ultimately achieves when approaching a task.

This study investigated the possible relationship between computer self-efficacy and teachers' use of computers for e-mail communication. Results indicated that the high end user reported an increased sense of computer self-efficacy. Consistent with the literature was the finding that younger teachers had significantly higher levels of computer self-efficacy and computer confidence than their older peers. Results of this study may assist in the awareness of the relationship between computer self-efficacy/confidence and frequency of computer use for e-mail purposes. Ultimately it may provide valuable information for the planning, creation and implementation of professional development opportunities.

Citation

Goodwin, B.J. Electronic mail: An investigation of the relationship between computer self-efficacy and teachers' use of computer technology for e-mail communication. Ph.D. thesis, Capella University. Retrieved November 14, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords