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The college-educated African American perception of asynchronous distance education
DISSERTATION

, Capella University, United States

Capella University . Awarded

Abstract

This study incorporated a look at asynchronous distance education and the college-educated African American’s perception of asynchronous distance education. This important study has many implications on African American population growth in areas of finance, sociological standing, and success. Educational level is a determinate of future income potential, according to Demarest et al. (1993). As asynchronous distance education emerges in all aspects of the American educational culture, it is important that this mixed culture benefits in an egalitarian fashion all members of American society. This study investigated the present perception of asynchronous distance education in the African American community. As previous study in this area has not included a breakdown by race or ethnicity, this study intended to fill the gap in research in this area. Possible adaptations necessary to ensure unrestricted use of this education delivery method will be generated as a result of this research; as may be seen in African Americans who may not use or understand its uses.

Citation

Clark, A.D. The college-educated African American perception of asynchronous distance education. Ph.D. thesis, Capella University. Retrieved November 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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