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Are distance education programs at historically minority institutions in the University of North Carolina System mission or market driven? An empirical and qualitative study
DISSERTATION

, North Carolina State University, United States

North Carolina State University . Awarded

Abstract

This dissertation reviews factors surrounding the implementation of Distance Education at four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and one Historically Minority Institution that may have broad implications for use of instructional technology. Through the lens of the digital divide, the analysis addresses whether Internet courses offered at HBCUs offset the traditional mission to serve African American students. The Logic of Governance, Reduced Model formula is used as a possible framework for administrators when implementing Distance Education programs and to identify future research. The formula shows that organizational outcomes are partially a function of environmental factors such as cost of implementing Distance Education and priorities of the University of North Carolina System; client characteristics such as behavior of the client base, using or avoiding Internet technology; treatments including organizational mission and technologies; structures such as HBCU culture, values, and legislative monetary allocations; and managerial roles such as methods and influence in decision-making. Both qualitative and quantitative findings are presented to offer a possible explanation for the complex processes of implementing Distance Education programs at HBCUs. One of the qualitative findings is that the respondents felt that utilizing Distance Education is appropriate for the institutional mission. Although the population data shows that HBCUs offer primarily face-to-face courses, the quantitative analysis of the technology-mediated subset reveals that African American students take Internet courses at a slightly higher rate than White students. The collective action of HBCUs in the University of North Carolina System appears to overcome the digital divide as it relates to taking Internet courses. Policy recommendations include revisiting organizational mission, ensuring alignment with goals and future directions; developing a new process for students to choose the best distance learning modality for them; implementing technology for convenient analysis of Distance Education student population data; correcting low funding of HBCUs; and, finally, conducting further research to determine socioeconomic information and other areas relevant to administrator decision-making.

Citation

Price, M.A. Are distance education programs at historically minority institutions in the University of North Carolina System mission or market driven? An empirical and qualitative study. Ph.D. thesis, North Carolina State University. Retrieved November 14, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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