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The Internet as a new forum for popular culture discourse in Israel: An examination of the impact of online popular culture messages on Jewish values
DISSERTATION

, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States

State University of New York at Buffalo . Awarded

Abstract

The primary intent of this study is to explore the manner in which Israeli elementary school computer coordinators from the Modern-Orthodox and secular sectors manage student access to Internet-generated popular culture messages that may potentially conflict with Jewish or human values taught by their educational stream. Also important is determining whether Rokeach's Comprehensive Theory of Change facilitates understanding Israeli educators' rationale for resolving value conflicts created by access to Internet-generated popular culture. 70 Jerusalem elementary school computer coordinators were asked to complete a mail questionnaire in Hebrew, which was translated to English for data analysis. These computer coordinators offered a unique vantage point because they have much experience in facilitating the implementation of computer and Internet usage with both classroom teachers and their students while observing the results. Because their central role is enabling access to technology, most computer coordinators are proficient in Hebrew and English. The key finding was that secular Mamlachti and the religious Mamlachti-Dati educators, each in their own manner, based on their own of frame of reference, have learned to successfully manage conflicting Internet popular culture messages, in order to maintain stability and consistency for themselves and their students.

Citation

Sherlick, L.H. The Internet as a new forum for popular culture discourse in Israel: An examination of the impact of online popular culture messages on Jewish values. Ph.D. thesis, State University of New York at Buffalo. Retrieved October 18, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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