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The effects of integrated technology programs on twelfth grade girls in comprehensive technology-rich secondary school environments, in terms of girls' attitudes toward computer usage
DISSERTATION

, Seton Hall University, United States

Seton Hall University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of integrated technology programs on twelfth grade girls in comprehensive technology-rich secondary school environments, in terms of girls' attitudes toward computer usage. Data were collected from senior girls in technology rich and non-technology rich secondary programs in similar district factor groups. Quantitative survey data was complemented by qualitative focus group data. Results showed there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of attitudes toward computer use. Specifically, girls felt comfortable using computers, that computers were necessary at school and in their future careers, and computer use was not considered a male domain. The difference between school and home computer use was significant. Girls reported using computers at school an hour or less a week at school, compared to a weekly home use of 10 hours a week or more. A One-Way ANOVA revealed girls who spent more time using the computer reported greater confidence with their skill level. Home use activities and parents as role models are also discussed. Focus group comments supported quantitative results and are summarized in the Appendix section.

Citation

Schneider, K.J. The effects of integrated technology programs on twelfth grade girls in comprehensive technology-rich secondary school environments, in terms of girls' attitudes toward computer usage. Ph.D. thesis, Seton Hall University. Retrieved January 22, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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