You are here:

An examination of music software and music videos for college beginning class piano students
DISSERTATION

, The University of Memphis, United States

The University of Memphis . Awarded

Abstract

One of the strengths of music-related software and videos is their ability to be used as partners in the music education system. The purpose of this study is to explore and examine music software and music videos for college beginning class piano students. A total of fifteen software programs and five videos are selected and reviewed. The software programs selected for the present study are grouped into four categories: (1) keyboard, (2) ear training, (3) rhythm, and (4) music theory. The videos selected are of two types: (1) videos that develop basic piano skills and (2) videos that develop technical skill necessary for playing the instrument.

The goal used as the criterion for the present study is that students will acquire the fundamentals of music--pitch reading skill, rhythm reading skill, intervals, meters, key signatures, and scales. Other criteria are also evaluated: presentation techniques, visual effect, student and machine interaction, teaching strategies, use of special function keys, overall style and organization, subject matter accuracy, technical/mechanical function, and supporting documentation.

All materials used in the study are confined to those which are instructional in content, and are suitable for use with college beginning class piano students. Results of the programs evaluated indicate that it is more appropriate to compare the software programs and videos with regard to their music components rather than as full programs. The musical components evaluated are (1) fingerings and scales, (2) intervals, (3) keyboard and staff reading, (4) key signatures, (5) rhythm reading, and (6) technical aspects. Recommendations exist concerning these musical components.

Citation

Chao, S.E.L. An examination of music software and music videos for college beginning class piano students. Ph.D. thesis, The University of Memphis. Retrieved March 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords