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Analysis of musical creativity in middle school students through composition using computer-assisted instruction: A multiple case study
DISSERTATION

, University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music, United States

University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the creative process of middle school children who used professional music software while engaging in composition activities. Three research questions were addressed: (1) What is the music composition process of middle school students while engaging in music composition activities? (2) How is the computer used in this composition process? (3) Are developmental models of creativity such as those proposed by Swanwick & Tillman (1986) and Levi (1991) appropriate when applied to the middle school students in this study?

This multiple case study, begun in the fall of 1995, documents the creative process of six seventh-grade student volunteers from two different schools. Because of the need for flexibility, a qualitative research approach was implemented to answer the three questions above. Data were reported through case studies describing the subjects' creative process while composing music in a general music classroom setting using professional computer software.

Emmons proposes (1) formation, (2) preservation, and (3) revision as three parts of a non-linear, non-sequential model of the creative process. This process is tightly linked to the teaching received by the students. Students reported that the computer was easy to use and motivating to their composition process.

Citation

Emmons, S.E. Analysis of musical creativity in middle school students through composition using computer-assisted instruction: A multiple case study. Ph.D. thesis, University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music. Retrieved November 17, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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