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The development of a model of a healthcare information infrastructure for the delivery of education in the home to Medicare patients with diabetes DISSERTATION

, Pepperdine University, United States

Pepperdine University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a model of a healthcare information infrastructure, specifically with the use of expanded television, digital capabilities, and the Internet, to facilitate the delivery of education and training in the home to Medicare patients with diabetes.

Recognizing that managed care and a prospective pay system bring a new set of financial issues to the home healthcare industry, providers are being challenged to find more cost-effective ways of delivering care.

Burgeoning technology is creating exciting opportunities and new roles for the home healthcare industry to explore more cost-effective options for the delivery of patient care. More than ever, education is taking on a greater role in assisting patients to self-manage their own care.

The naturalistic inquiry process chosen for this exploratory study formed the basis by which this researcher explored—with 12 selected experts—the characteristics and components of an on-line healthcare information model for the delivery of education and training in the home to Medicare patients with diabetes.

The gathering and analysis of the data was an ongoing, complementary, and often simultaneous process during which the data collection procedures and strategies were continually adjusted to yield new data.

Data were obtained from the transcribed interviews of the 12 experts. These data were subsequently unitized, or divided into 534 units of meaning, and then coded. The data were then reduced to three major categories with 15 themes. The characteristics and components of an on-line healthcare information model suggested by the experts are found in these three categories.

This dissertation expands our knowledge about the impact that information-based technology currently has on home healthcare organizations and provides a glimpse of the even-greater impact it can have in the future. The most significant finding illuminated by the data is whether or not current technology is able to provide an on-line healthcare information model which actually permits patients to interact with educational programs to receive self-directed, self-paced instruction and non-linear training, allowing review of instructional material in any order through the use of their television sets.

The data revealed that, although at this time much of the technology is in place to provide for this model, improvements are still needed in regard to bandwidth issues and the transmission of motion pictures of adequate quality via the Internet. However, two options were revealed through the data as recommended by the technology experts, which are currently workable in delivering on-line healthcare information in the home, through patients' television sets.

The first and best option involves the use of a set-top box—multimedia player with a CD-ROM and a modem to access educational programs from a central Web server. In the home, patients can access these interactive educational programs on the Internet by using their television set as a monitor to play back interactive software.

The second option is to employ data streaming technology from the central server. However, the video frame rates are inadequate unless the data are streamed over an “Intranet.”

It was recommended that the key characteristics and components which were identified by the experts be incorporated in an educational program which utilizes technologies that make efficient use of existing bandwidth.

Citation

Bedrosian, C.A. The development of a model of a healthcare information infrastructure for the delivery of education in the home to Medicare patients with diabetes. Ph.D. thesis, Pepperdine University. Retrieved November 18, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

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