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An exploratory study of organizational culture and its relationship to organizational effectiveness in distance education institutions
DISSERTATION

, University of Maryland University College, United States

University of Maryland University College . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation is to define the elements of organizational culture that seem to correlate best with the effectiveness of distance education institutions. The success of a college or university depends on how well it responds to meeting its educational mission and strategic goals. The vast majority of the studies to date have focused on the relationship of effectiveness and organizational culture in traditional two and four-year institutions. The extent to which the findings are applicable to distance education institutions is unknown. Based on the literature review, the conceptual framework developed for this paper depicts relationships among seven cultural elements and their contributions to overall effectiveness in distance education institutions. This study can serve as a resource to academic leaders to help them select effective management and organizational strategies that will be congruent with the distinguishing elements of their culture. This dissertation explores factors that are instrumental in providing awareness to campus leaders about the specific management initiatives and practices on which they may want to focus or that they might want to avoid in efforts to build an alignment with the cultural values of the organization and enhance performance goals. Further, this study is of value to institutions interested in building a culture that enables and sustains quality improvements. The effects of organizational culture and its relationship to institutional performance are examined, and broader implications on the practice of management are discussed.

Citation

Willis, D.A. An exploratory study of organizational culture and its relationship to organizational effectiveness in distance education institutions. Ph.D. thesis, University of Maryland University College. Retrieved December 7, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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