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Effects of single and multiple expository texts presented in print and electronic form on sixth graders' reading comprehension
DISSERTATION

, University of Georgia, United States

University of Georgia . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine the impact text presentation format had on sixth-grade students' reading comprehension. Specifically, the following research question was posed: What are the effects of single and multiple expository texts presented in print and electronic form on sixth graders' reading comprehension? The study evaluated students' comprehension after they read expository texts presented in one of three different formats: (a) multiple electronic texts that included an electronic primary text hyperlinked to four, shorter, complementary electronic texts; (b) multiple print texts that included a print version of the same primary text with print versions of the four, shorter, complementary texts; and (c) a single print text that was a print version of the primary text. Dependent measures evaluated students' comprehension of the primary text, the complementary texts, and the intertextual connections between the primary text and the complementary texts. Findings indicated that students presented with the primary text only had greater comprehension of that text than did students who were presented with both the primary and secondary texts.

Citation

Font, G. Effects of single and multiple expository texts presented in print and electronic form on sixth graders' reading comprehension. Ph.D. thesis, University of Georgia. Retrieved April 26, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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