You are here:

Reading instruction of first-grade students within a whole learning reading program using CD-ROM versus traditional print storybooks
DISSERTATION

, St. John's University (New York), School of Education and Human Services, United States

St. John's University (New York), School of Education and Human Services . Awarded

Abstract

This researcher investigated the use of technology within a whole learning reading program to determine whether statistically significant differences in reading achievement develop between instruction using traditional text in a classroom setting and electronic print in the form of books on CD-ROM used in a computer lab setting. Participants were 92 first-grade students from a large, semi-rural elementary school in Orange County, New York. All of the subjects received instruction under both control and treatment conditions. Subjects scores on a district-wide fall reading matrix were used as pre-treatment observations to determine equality of groups. Three days following a sequence of instruction led by the teacher were conducted using traditional and electronic print books. Three books were completed under each method/medium. The books on CD were selected from Level B in the Scholastic Beginning Literacy System WiggleWorks. The same books used on CD were used in traditional print. Post testing was conducted individually after instruction on each book. Assessment included a 20 item word list, a 70–80 word passage (both taken from the text of the book used), 5 factual comprehension questions, and a retelling. Information on or about the computer's effectiveness as a source of language development through pre-literacy experiences to increase sight word vocabulary and in improving comprehension were addressed. The study served to evaluate the effectiveness of books on CD as a delivery mode for whole learning instruction in reading. Results indicate that the use of books on CD are particularly effective in increasing beginning readers' sight word vocabularies (word list) and their ability to retell a story. This outcome was particularly found to be true for low achievers, who performed better on these tasks using electronic books than traditional print. Students generally gained more on reading from context (word passage) and answering questions using traditional print.

Citation

Carlough, J.C. Reading instruction of first-grade students within a whole learning reading program using CD-ROM versus traditional print storybooks. Ph.D. thesis, St. John's University (New York), School of Education and Human Services. Retrieved February 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords