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The application of multimedia in arts-integrated curricula
DISSERTATION

, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

Teachers College, Columbia University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate instances in which the creation of student-generated, multimedia works (i.e. the combination of sounds, visuals, and text) helps to realize arts-integrated, educational strategies. Through a series of six case studies, the researcher will seek to explore the questions: Under what circumstances can multimedia production support the fulfillment of arts-integrated curricula? What are the outcomes of those multimedia strategies?

What I seek to do is study the use of multimedia as a way of putting student-generated music, visuals and text together in an arts-integrated context. In doing this, I hope to limit myself to using only materials that are currently available to the classroom in which I am working.

The intention is to present a series of unique case studies in order to make comparisons and to draw flexible conclusions about multimedia in arts-integrated curricula that interested teachers can apply to their own unique classrooms. Data will include descriptive observation, teacher interviews, and student interviews. This research will be formative rather than summative; inductive rather than deductive. It seeks to answer questions about the quality of what is taking place. This study will offer a sort of prismatic view of the use of multimedia in arts-integrated curricula.

It is not the intention of this study to reap generalizable results that teachers everywhere can rely upon. My intention is to generate results that are unique and cannot, in all likelihood, be exactly duplicated in another context. As Merriam (1988) says, "The interest is in process rather than outcomes, in context rather than a specific variable, in discovery rather than confirmation."

Citation

Carr, R.J. The application of multimedia in arts-integrated curricula. Ph.D. thesis, Teachers College, Columbia University. Retrieved November 12, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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