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Deceit and misrepresentation of the qualifications of United States Army flight and combat mission simulator instructors: A case study, survey, and analyses DISSERTATION

, Union Institute and University, United States

Union Institute and University . Awarded

Abstract

This dissertation is an investigation of employment practices to determine if there is a relationship between the hiring of unqualified applicants who may have aggrandized their previous experience and education, and the substandard training of aircrew members. Utilizing a triangulation methodology, this study sought to provide an in-depth analysis of a specific case and the series of events that related to résumé embellishment and its impact on the United States Army (the employer). A case study, survey/questionnaire instrument (Aviation Professional Occupational Survey), and analyses (The Laws) were utilized to investigate two major areas. First, the qualification standards published by the Office of Personnel Management were studied and weighed against the specific requirements the Army had outlined in a series of position (job) vacancy announcements with the results proving consistent; the desired and mandatory standards were reflected in the position requirements. Second, the actual hiring practices were examined and showed that unqualified personnel, many technically ineligible to apply, were referred to selecting officials, and ultimately hired. Most are still employed in positions that allow the presentation of training they are not authorized to provide.

Keywords: organizational behavior/misbehavior, organizational development, organizational values; résumé embellishment, misrepresentation of qualifications, employment practices; ethics and moral development, ethical decision-making; flight training, flight instruction, military organization.

Citation

Helmer, G.W. Deceit and misrepresentation of the qualifications of United States Army flight and combat mission simulator instructors: A case study, survey, and analyses. Ph.D. thesis, Union Institute and University. Retrieved October 17, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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