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Learning styles as predictors of student attitudes toward the use of technology in recreation courses
DISSERTATION

, Indiana University, United States

Indiana University . Awarded

Abstract

The problem of the study was to determine whether the learning styles of students act as predictors of their attitudes toward technology use in the curriculum. The learning styles were measured using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and attitudes toward technology measured by a survey instrument developed specifically for this study (Attitudes Toward the Use of Technology Survey). The subjects of the study were enrolled in recreation courses offered during the fall semester of the 2001–2002 school year in the Department of Recreation and Park Administration at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Results of a multiple regression analysis used to distinguish whether attitude toward technology could be predicted by gender, class standing, major concentration, and learning style, showed no significant results. The results of a principal components analysis supported a two-factor solution for the 12 items contained in the third section of the Attitudes Toward the Use of Technology Survey. These two factors were Internet and CD-ROM technologies. The results indicating the frequent use of computers for “one to one” communication (email) and web surfing supported the literature regarding the steady increase in the use of electronic mail and the Internet by students in higher education.

Results showed a high percentage of respondents who claimed that several of the technologies listed in the third section of the Attitudes Toward the Use of Technology Survey were either “Not Applicable” or they were “Undecided” as to whether it had a positive or negative affect on them. For example, the use of DVD technology in the classroom was either “Not Applicable” or “Undecided” for 50.5% of respondents and the use of a class listserv scored 47.7%. If a high percentage of students have never seen these technologies being used, then it may stand to bear that students may not have had enough exposure to the technology to see the benefits of them. Also, with reference to limited use, instructors may either be unfamiliar with the benefits of these technologies or uninterested in learning about them.

Citation

Lukow, J.E. Learning styles as predictors of student attitudes toward the use of technology in recreation courses. Ph.D. thesis, Indiana University. Retrieved October 14, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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