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Predictors of achievement using computer-assisted instruction: Self-efficacy for achievement and control of learning beliefs DISSERTATION

, University of Houston, United States

University of Houston . Awarded

Abstract

In order to assess the effectiveness of computer assisted-instruction (CAI) and provide valuable information for the development of CAI programs that can foster learning, it is important to understand the complex nature of students' motivation and cognition in CAI learning. More evidence is necessary to justify the investment of this expensive educational tool in schools and colleges. The primary goal of this study was to examine the relations between self-efficacy for achievement and control of learning beliefs and academic achievement while controlling for prior knowledge. The secondary goal of this study was to investigate whether time using CAI was positively related to prior knowledge, self-efficacy for achievement and control beliefs. In addition, the kind of learning strategies that students employed using a CAI program were also explored.

Thirty-three baccalaureate occupational therapy students from an urban university were given four weeks to learn the topic of human anatomy and manual muscle testing from a CAI program. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire was administered before and after students used the CAI program. Students' achievement was then measured by a test on course material. A general linear model and correlational analysis were utilized to assess the relation between self-efficacy, control of learning beliefs and academic performance. Results from the study showed a significant positive relation between self-efficacy and achievement. The hypothesis that academic achievement could be predicted from self-efficacy when controlling for prior knowledge was partially supported. The significant interaction effect of prior knowledge indicated that academic achievement can be predicted from self-efficacy only for low prior knowledge students. However, no significant findings for the relation between control of learning beliefs and achievement were found. For the secondary goal of investigating the uses of the computer program, the findings indicated that there was no significant positive relation between time spent using CAI and prior knowledge, self-efficacy and control of learning beliefs. From the results of the exploratory analyses, rehearsal, elaboration, and critical thinking strategies were more likely to be used by students using CAI. Finally, the strengths and limitations of this study were discussed.

Citation

Chan, J.S. Predictors of achievement using computer-assisted instruction: Self-efficacy for achievement and control of learning beliefs. Ph.D. thesis, University of Houston. Retrieved September 22, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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