You are here:

Effects of an educational computing course on preservice and inservice teachers' attitudes toward computers
DISSERTATION

, University of Southern California, United States

University of Southern California . Awarded

Abstract

This study examined the changes in pre-service and in-service teachers' attitudes toward computers following the participation in an educational computing class, and explored the factors that contributed to changes in attitudes. The study used data from 114 (83 female, 31 male) pre-service and in-service teachers who attended two universities in Southern California.

The one-way MANOVA analysis of pretest attitudes indicated that there were significant differences among the levels of competency (novice, intermediate, and competent) on teachers' pretest attitudes (anxiety, confidence, and liking) toward computers. Posttest attitudes of teachers were also analyzed using one-way MANOVA. The results indicated that the differences detected among varying levels of competency disappeared after the intervention which was the computer literacy course. A Doubly Multivariate Repeated Measures MANOVA was used to examine multivariate main effect for both "level of competency" and "pretest and posttest" measures for attitudes toward computers. The results revealed a significant multivariate main effect for both "level of competency" and "pretest and posttest" indicating that teachers' attitudes (anxiety, confidence, and liking) significantly improved after the computer literacy course.

The follow-up study indicated that teachers' prior computer experience shapes their expectations from the course. Competent users requested specific training on high-end software while teachers with no or little prior experience with computers requested to be exposed to the basics of computers and more personal attention from the instructor. Regardless of their competency levels, all teachers agreed the course was most useful to those who had no prior computer experience, and a follow-up computer course would contribute more to their professional development. Teachers reported that having a home computer, professor's willingness to teach, and the current utilization of technology in the schools at which they work also had influence on their attitudes toward computers.

Citation

Yildirim, I.S. Effects of an educational computing course on preservice and inservice teachers' attitudes toward computers. Ph.D. thesis, University of Southern California. Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords