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The role of Ohio public school administrators in the educational technology policy-making process
DISSERTATION

, The Ohio State University, United States

The Ohio State University . Awarded

Abstract

With all of its positive aspects, the infusion of educational technology into public schools brings to the table several important issues. Administrators could potentially play an important role in helping to shape educational technology policies at the national, state, district, and building levels.

An exploratory study has been conducted to ascertain (1) the principal's actual level of involvement in creating educational technology policy; (2) the principal's desired level of involvement in creating educational technology policy; and (3) the factors that influence variance in their responses.

Ohio administrators returned 253 of a total 432 surveys (58.9%). A factor analysis was performed on the data, and five dependent variables emerged: (1) Actual Level of Involvement at the Building Level; (2) Actual Level of Involvement at the District Level; (3) Desired Level of Involvement at the District Level; (4) Actual Level of Involvement at the State/National Level; and (5) Desired Level of Involvement at the State/National Level. The relationship various independent variables have with the five dependent variables were examined using analysis of variance (ANOVA), simple linear regression analysis, and multiple regression analysis.

Overall, it was found that on average principals have moderate to substantial involvement in the educational policy-making process at the building level; little to moderate involvement at the district level; and no involvement at the state/national levels. It was also found that administrators on average desire to be moderately involved at the district level, but desire almost no involvement at the state and national levels.

It was discovered that District Type and Building Level have an effect on dependent variables “Actual Level of Involvement at the District Level” and “Desired Level of Involvement at the District Level.” Overall, urban principals are less involved and have less desire to be involved in the educational technology policy-making process at the district level than principals in suburban and rural schools. This is particularly acute for elementary school principals. Other independent variables that had significant effects include: District Poverty Level, District Size, Knowledge of the Policy-Making Process at the State/National Level, Knowledge of the Policy-Making Process at the Local Level, and Highest Degree Earned.

Citation

Nance, J.P. The role of Ohio public school administrators in the educational technology policy-making process. Ph.D. thesis, The Ohio State University. Retrieved October 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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