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A study to determine the efficacy of a computer program designed to help students increase their ability to decode three-letter, short-A, consonant-vowel-consonant (c-v-c) words DISSERTATION

, The University of New Mexico, United States

Doctor of Philosophy, The University of New Mexico . Awarded

Abstract

Some students have difficulty mastering basic decoding strategies, which adversely effects their ability to read. Decoding is generally the first cause of reading problems for people who have difficulty reading. Differences in decoding skills between good and poor readers are particularly striking when students begin to read (Torgeson, 1986). Phonics-based computer-assisted instruction can help alleviate reading problems. Unfortunately, there are not enough high quality phonics software programs available.

The purpose of this study was to test the effects of "The Short-A Sound," an original software program developed for this study. "The Short-A Sound" was designed to help students learn to sound out three-letter words. A multiple-methods, across-subjects design was used to test the effects on 14 students. Thirteen students demonstrated reading gains from the study. Most of the gains of 8 of the 13 students were attributable to "The Short-A Sound". "The Short-A Sound" was partly responsible for the reading gains of all students in the study.

Citation

Adamson, R.D. A study to determine the efficacy of a computer program designed to help students increase their ability to decode three-letter, short-A, consonant-vowel-consonant (c-v-c) words. Doctor of Philosophy thesis, The University of New Mexico. Retrieved September 18, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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