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Educational technology integration: Administrator, full-time faculty, and part-time faculty perspectives as viewed through gender and position type
DISSERTATION

, The George Washington University, United States

Doctor of Education, The George Washington University . Awarded

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between an individual's level of technology integration and his perspective of technology, as viewed through the lenses of gender and role at the college. Using a critical constructivist paradigm, I interviewed 21 employees of a community college, including administrators, full-time faculty and adjunct faculty members. I used a modified model of Rogers' diffusion process and Hall and Hord's Concerns-Based Adoption Model to determine the participants' level of technology integration. Then the contextual data about the physical and human/social environments provided by the interview transcripts was analyzed on a literal and metaphorical level to provide insight into the participant's conscious and subconscious perspectives of technology.

Next, I present each individual's perspective of technology in a separate narrative. The perspectives of the groups as defined by my variables of gender and position type follow the individual perspectives. A discussion of the relationship among the factors of role at the college, gender, and level of technology integration is interwoven with the group perspectives.

The analysis of the participants by group revealed that position at the campus seemed to influence one's perspective of technology, particularly with reference to the campus technology decision-making process. On the other hand, gender did seem to be as much of a determining factor in one's perspective of technology, while level of technology integration did. The influence of level of technology integration could be seen in what was perceived as a facilitator or a barrier to technology integration.

Finally, I propose a holistic model of an individual's perspective of technology that combines an analysis of level of technology integration with contextual data on the physical and human/social environments. Because the model suggests alternate conceptions of facilitating technology diffusion based upon the perspectives of the trainees rather than that of the trainer, it would be useful for technology trainers and faculty technology mentors.

Citation

Naquin, D.A. Educational technology integration: Administrator, full-time faculty, and part-time faculty perspectives as viewed through gender and position type. Doctor of Education thesis, The George Washington University. Retrieved May 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

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