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Effects of computer-assisted writing instruction on fourth-grade students
DISSERTATION

, The Union Institute, United States

Doctor of Philosophy, The Union Institute . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of computer assisted writing instruction on the writing achievement of fourth grade students. This study took the form of a quantitative experimental study with methodology including the use of a control group and an experimental group involving baseline and post-treatment data. This involved a group of fifteen fourth grade students in the experimental group with computer access and instruction specifically pertaining to writing, while providing traditional whole language activities to the control group. Students in both groups were allocated 90 minute sessions, 3 days a week and 45 minutes, 2 days a week for writing instruction; a total of 6 hours a week. By using a pretest/post test control group design, for a period of approximately five months, it was discovered that the students (n = 15) who were instructed using computer assisted writing instruction showed no significant difference in test scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) Writing Examination than did the students (n = 15) who received traditional methods of writing instruction, t = .67, df = 28, p > .05. It was concluded that the computer-assisted writing instruction showed no significant difference in raising the achievement level of the participating students. In addition, there was no significant difference in attitudinal survey scores between students (n = 15) who received computer-assisted writing instruction in the experimental group and the students (n = 15) who received traditional methods of writing instruction in the control group, t = .65, df = 28, p > .05. Therefore, the null hypothesis was accepted in both areas regarding the effects of computer-assisted writing instruction.

Citation

Palenzuela, E. Effects of computer-assisted writing instruction on fourth-grade students. Doctor of Philosophy thesis, The Union Institute. Retrieved April 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

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