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The impact of high-fidelity human patient simulation on clinical judgment of nursing students: A pilot study
THESIS

, University of New Hampshire, United States

Master of Science, University of New Hampshire . Awarded

Abstract

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing is encouraging their constituents to increase clinical judgment of nursing students to meet increased workplace demands and higher patient acuity. The literature suggests that human patient simulation (HPS) may be a teaching pedagogy to promote clinical judgment. However, few quantitative studies exist that measure clinical judgment as an outcome of HPS. A pilot study was conducted using a quasi-experimental design that randomly assigned subjects (n = 11) into one of three groups: control, traditional and experimental. Subjects completed pretests for three dimensions of clinical judgment: knowledge, confidence and skill. Following the intervention which consisted of a lecture, and either written or HPS scenarios, the subjects completed posttests for each dimension. Results found that clinical judgment was not increased as a result of HPS. However, subjects in the experimental group following HPS significantly increased the clinical judgment dimension of skill.

Citation

Boyd, T.L. The impact of high-fidelity human patient simulation on clinical judgment of nursing students: A pilot study. Master of Science thesis, University of New Hampshire. Retrieved December 12, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

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