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Hybrid Online Face-to-face Courses: a Sociological analysis
PROCEEDINGS

, , Stony Brook University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-54-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Hybrid online face-to-face courses have grown steadily the last five years. "Hybrid" courses are face-to-face courses where thirty per cent or more of class work uses the Web (Marold, 2002). Hybrid courses are less researched than fully online asynchronous courses. This study used a micro-sociological perspective to analyze interactions in a number of hybrid courses and fully face-to-face courses. Micro-sociological constructs motivating this research include "I" versus "me", "self-talk" and "front" and "back" regions. The "me" is the social self. The individual's "I" is the active nature that can be impulsive in reaction to other people. "Self-talk" is an inner dialogue where a person assumes multiple roles of participants to replay recent conversations or rehearse upcoming encounters. In the "front stage" individuals perform scripted actions to impress an audience. The "back" stage is the place, far from the public eye, where the techniques of impression management are practiced.

Citation

Smith, G. & Kurthen, H. (2004). Hybrid Online Face-to-face Courses: a Sociological analysis. In J. Nall & R. Robson (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2004--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2431-2435). Washington, DC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

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