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Student LMS use and satisfaction in academic institutions: The organizational perspective
ARTICLE

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Internet and Higher Education Volume 13, Number 3, ISSN 1096-7516 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The present paper examines student use of and satisfaction with the Learning Management System (LMS), and how these dependent variables are correlated with organizational variables at one Israeli university. Data on 1212 course websites was gathered in 2007 from the LMS warehouse, the student-management database, the instructor–management database, and satisfaction questionnaires. The findings indicate varied use of LMS, a high level of satisfaction, and low significant correlation between use and satisfaction. As for the organizational variables, course content was found to significantly correlate with use and satisfaction; course size, instructor status and forum existence showed significant correlation with LMS use; and course discipline had low correlation with satisfaction. Further studies and practical implications are discussed.

Citation

Naveh, G., Tubin, D. & Pliskin, N. (2010). Student LMS use and satisfaction in academic institutions: The organizational perspective. Internet and Higher Education, 13(3), 127-133. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 25, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Internet and Higher Education on January 29, 2019. Internet and Higher Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2010.02.004

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