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Walking or Dancing? Images of Thinking and Learning to Think in the Classroom
Article

, Open University, United Kingdom

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 13, Number 1, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

n this article the author explores two different ways of conceptualising the teaching and learning of thinking using transcripts of classroom talk taken from two different empirical studies. The first study describes how teaching ground rules for more effective talking helped groups to solve non-verbal reasoning test problems. These same children then did statistically better than matching control classes at individual nonverbal reasoning tests. The second study describes how a teacher inducted groups of young children into reasoning together. The language strategies used by the teacher exemplified ground rules for shared thinking. These strategies were shown to be transferring from the teacher to the children over a period of time. The model of internalisation, taken with modifications from Vygotsky, can be applied to help explain how the individuals in the first study improved their reasoning test scores. However this model fails to account for the change in the culture of the classroom. To help explain this dimension of learning a new model of learning to think is developed from the evidence provided by the second study. This model is that the teacher makes ground rules explicit, they are then used explicitly by the children, and finally they become implicit shared assumptions behind the talk. The author argues that this implication model does not necessarily replace the internalisation model but can be useful when the focus is on learning that occurs in cultures.

Citation

Wegerif, R. (2002). Walking or Dancing? Images of Thinking and Learning to Think in the Classroom. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 13(1), 51-70. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 27, 2020 from .

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