You are here:

The Impact of 1:1 Laptop Use on Middle School Math and Science Standardized Test Scores ARTICLE

,

Computers in the Schools Volume 24, Number 3, ISSN 0738-0569

Abstract

Researchers and evaluators have been attempting to document the impact of ubiquitous or 1:1 computing on students, teachers, schools, and communities. However, the most recent reviews of research on 1:1 computing initiatives reflect a dearth of rigorous studies and emphasize the need for well-designed, scientifically based research to measure the impact of 1:1 learning on student achievement. This study investigates the effect of 1:1 laptop to student ratios on math and science achievement in at-risk middle school students. The researchers used a pretest-posttest control-group design. The findings are based on between-groups analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) of longitudinal data comparing standardized achievement test scores. The researchers compared the test scores of students randomly assigned to 1:1 laptop classrooms with the test scores of students in classrooms without 1:1 laptops in the same middle school. Students were exposed to the treatment for two years and the authors used the students as the unit of analysis. Pre-existing achievement scores for each student were included as a covariate to statistically equate groups previous to analysis. Results showed significant post-intervention program effects for science achievement. Furthermore, there was a gender effect in science achievement, with boys significantly outperforming girls in the same 1:1 laptop classroom. In contrast, no significant program effects for math achievement were obtained. The results suggest that 1:1 laptop instruction can increase student achievement under certain conditions. This study has implications for policymakers, instructional designers, and educators who are currently implementing a 1:1 laptop program or considering such an implementation. The authors suggest the need for further research to help determine the efficacy of 1:1 laptop instruction and the implementation conditions necessary for increased student achievement in this context.

Citation

Dunleavy, M. & Heinecke, W.F. (2008). The Impact of 1:1 Laptop Use on Middle School Math and Science Standardized Test Scores. Computers in the Schools, 24(3), 7-22. Retrieved September 18, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Multimedia Open Educational Resources in Mathematics for High School Students with Learning Disabilities

    Sanghoon Park, University of South Florida, United States; Kenneth McLeod, Northwestern State University, United States

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching Vol. 37, No. 2 (April 2018) pp. 131–153

  2. Integrating a BYOD Program in High School English: Advantage or Distraction?

    Robin Kay & Derrick Schellenberg, UOIT, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2017 (Jun 20, 2017) pp. 12–16

  3. The experience of a first-year principal transforming teaching and learning in a one-to-one computing environment

    Stefani N. Pautz & William A. Sadera, Towson University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 1105–1107

  4. A Comparison of Classrooms of Tomorrow (COT) and 1:1 Classrooms and Associated High School Student Learning Outcomes

    Tina Heafner & Ponscheck Ashley, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 831–838

  5. Comparison of Technology Use Between Biology and Physics Teachers in a 1:1 Laptop Environment

    Simon J. Crook, Manjula D. Sharma & Rachel Wilson, University of Sydney, Australia

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 2015) pp. 126–160

  6. Large-Scale 1:1 Computing Initiatives: An Open Access Database

    Jayson Richardson, Scott Mcleod, Kevin Flora & Nick Sauers, University of Kentucky, United States; Sathiamoorthy Kannan, University of Malaya, Malaysia; Mehmet Sincar, University of Gaziantep, Turkey

    International Journal of Education and Development using ICT Vol. 9, No. 1 (Apr 19, 2013) pp. 4–18

  7. Smartphones-Smart Students: A Review of the Literature

    Hans Friedel, Beth Bos & Kathryn Lee, Texas State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (Mar 25, 2013) pp. 1862–1868

  8. Evaluating A Ubiquitous Computing Initiative

    Sean Lancaster & Andrew Topper, Grand Valley State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 1553–1555

  9. Evaluating K-12 1:1 Laptop Initiatives

    Sean Lancaster & Andrew Topper, Grand Valley State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2010 (Mar 29, 2010) pp. 1011–1013

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.