You are here:

Can Technology Help Teachers and Students Break Down Gender Stereotypes?
PROCEEDINGS

, Arizona State University West ; , ON CD-ROM

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This desescriptive study of elementary school children analyzes naturalistic data from six sources to answer the question, “How does gender interface with computers and telecommunications?” Data included field notes based on six months of participation and observation, 750 pages of email messages, daily logs and newsletters by the children, and transcripts of interviews. A feminist perspective informed the analysis. Analysis seemed to warrant three claims: both girls and boys used technology to confirm gender stereotypes, both girls and boys used technology to defy gender stereotypes, and gender biases in classroom interactions are more invisible and more difficult to eliminate than expected. A feminist perspective is essential in this struggle, but insufficient for eliminating the culturally-embedded, long-standing gender-biases pervading our schools and lives.

Citation

Christie, A.A. & INFO, M. (1996). Can Technology Help Teachers and Students Break Down Gender Stereotypes?. In B. Robin, J. Price, J. Willis & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1996--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 63-67). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 23, 2019 from .

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References