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Electronic Database Searching and Culturally Diverse Populations: Access or Excess?
PROCEEDINGS

, , Baruch College, CUNY

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

As access to end-user electronic information systems grows, more attention needs to be directed to how diverse populations are learning, accessing and using these systems. The affect of language background and gender are areas of inquiry that call for closer examination and sensitivity. This paper reports on a study of 131 multicultural end-users who searched a full-text system, LEXIS/NEXIS. An analysis by native language indicate that there could be a correlation between native language and searching ability in a full-text system. These findings suggest that computer literate end-users with prior experience searching other databases and formal training are experiencing more difficulties than is commonly realized. Implications for training are discussed.

Citation

Zoe, L.R. & DiMartino, D. (1996). Electronic Database Searching and Culturally Diverse Populations: Access or Excess?. In B. Robin, J. Price, J. Willis & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1996--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 51-55). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

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