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Teaching for Success Linking Technology and Learning Styles in Higher Education
PROCEEDINGS

, , University of Minnesota, Morris, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, HI, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-73-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

David A. Kolb’s research on learning styles (1984, 2005, 2008) identified four learning style preferences based on how learners prefer to grasp and process information within the learning cycle. This quasi-experimental research study examines the achievement of second and third level university students when advice, in the form of text and resources, is provided based on students’ identified learning styles. Software was developed to link prepared “advice” for the completion of course tasks to particular learning style preferences. Advice was provided for ‘grasping’ and ‘processing’ stages of the learning cycle and served as a form of scaffolding through coaching provided via an online module. Data sources included student assessment results from the learning style preference advice software module, student reflection journals following use of advice software, and student scores—including assignment scores and overall GPA. Data analysis indicates positive effects of advice linked to learning style preferences on student achievement.

Citation

Solvie, P. & Sungur, E. (2009). Teaching for Success Linking Technology and Learning Styles in Higher Education. In G. Siemens & C. Fulford (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2009--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2312-2318). Honolulu, HI, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 19, 2019 from .