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Attitudes of Indigenous Peoples toward Distance Learning in the South Pacific: An Empirical Study
PROCEEDINGS

, School of Education, University of the South Pacific, Fiji

AACE Award

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, HI, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-73-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This research studied student satisfaction with the distance-learning program of X University, one of only two regional universities in the world. The University supports 12 Pacific Island countries in a region more than three times the size of Europe. The project used online surveys and face-to-face interviews at campuses to identify student and staff perceptions of the strengths and weaknesses of the distance-learning program. The researchers examined cultural, pedagogical, and infrastructure issues that impact the delivery of quality distance learning throughout the region. Findings indicate that student success and satisfaction were lower for distance learning students than for face-to-face students, and that both culture and skill level causes some students to prefer correspondence courses over online. In sharp contrast to US students, the study also found that many South Pacific students lack the typing and computer skills needed for online learning.

Citation

Hogan, R. (2009). Attitudes of Indigenous Peoples toward Distance Learning in the South Pacific: An Empirical Study. In G. Siemens & C. Fulford (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2009--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1064-1072). Honolulu, HI, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

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