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Gender Differences in the Informal Email Communications of Japanese Young People
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, Waseda University, Japan ; , Tokyo University of Social Welfare, Japan ; , Waseda University, Japan, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Quebec City, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-63-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

While there is research on gender differences in written communications, little work has been done to compare how these difference are expressed in various cultures. This study, based on work by Colley, et al, seeks to address this gap by studying the informal email communications of Japanese young people. 42 first year students (19 men, 23 women) at a large, private university in Tokyo were asked to recommend a restaurant to a friend in the form of a cellular telephone email message. Preliminary data show that gender differences exist in the Japanese sample, with women using graphical accents more than three times more on average than their male counterparts. Initial analysis indicates that the Japanese women's use of these marks may be different than Colley et al's sample. However, additional analysis is necessary to more fully compare the deeper elements of style and content of the two samples.

Citation

Scott, D.J., Kato, Y. & Kato, S. (2007). Gender Differences in the Informal Email Communications of Japanese Young People. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2007--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 6867-6871). Quebec City, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 16, 2020 from .

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