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Analysis of Anger in Mobile Phone Email Communications in Japan
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, Faculty of Human Sciences, Waseda University, Japan ; , Tokyo University of Social Welfare, Japan ; , Waseda University, Japan ; , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Quebec City, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-63-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper focuses on the emotion of anger experienced when using mobile phone email. By better understanding the causes of anger in email, it is hoped that strategies can be developed to avoid such emotional troubles. This paper describes a three-phase research project: The initial study investigated the causes of the occurrence of anger in email communication by mobile phone. Two follow-up studies were conducted to better understand the causes revealed in the initial study. One result was that late responses to mobile phone email causes anger significantly faster than tardy replies to computer email. In addition, results indicate that subjects experienced more sadness and anger and less joy when they read emails written using short sentences in comparison to emails containing emoticons suggesting that short sentences have a strong influence on emotions in textual communications.

Citation

Kato, S., Kato, Y., Scott, D.J. & Akahori, K. (2007). Analysis of Anger in Mobile Phone Email Communications in Japan. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2007--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 6083-6090). Quebec City, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 17, 2020 from .

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