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Divergence, Negotiation, and Convergence: A Discourse Analysis of a Student-Initiated Interactive Online Debate
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Using discourse analysis methods, this study investigated the pattern and contexts of a student-initiated, class debate that occurred through an asynchronous conferencing medium. Three main processes—divergent exploration of controversial sub-themes, negotiation through argumentative dialogues, and integration of the class discussion into students' own perspective developments—were examined across episodes throughout the online class debate over time. By discussing five instructional and social components that interactively shaped the pattern of divergence, negotiation, and convergence in the online class discussion, this qualitative research intended to enhance our understanding of this particular type of electronic collaborative learning as a multilateral social construct that is brought to promote students' recognition of differences and their understanding of the complexity of the issue.

Citation

An, J. (2005). Divergence, Negotiation, and Convergence: A Discourse Analysis of a Student-Initiated Interactive Online Debate. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2144-2151). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 29, 2020 from .

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