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Institutionalizing Technology in Schools: Resolving Teacher Concerns
PROCEEDINGS

, , The University of Louisiana, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-44-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The ultimate goal for technology in schools is to move teachers through the change process and integrate technology into teaching and learning to the extent that it becomes "normal" or institutionalized. Five hundred six PK-12 teachers were asked what specific aspects of instructional technology have had the greatest positive impact on their role as teachers. Results of the content analysis indicated that the respondents' comments naturally grouped into reports of (a) increased student motivation, interest and creativity; (b) a sense of personal and professional empowerment, (c) lack of time, training opportunities, technical support, and equipment; and (d) their perceived roles as technology leaders and trainers for peers. Respondents' comments fell into categories that parallel Hall's Stages of Concern and indicate that, although great progress has been made, teachers' perceptions of a lack of time, training, support, and equipment are a major barrier preventing the institutionalization of technology in schools.

Citation

Casey, H. & Rakes, G. (2002). Institutionalizing Technology in Schools: Resolving Teacher Concerns. In D. Willis, J. Price & N. Davis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2002--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2082-2085). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 15, 2019 from .

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