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Disinformation, Academia, and the Web: The Anonymous Battleground
PROCEEDINGS

, , The University of Louisiana, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-44-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Expending less energy than was previously required to convey information one-to-one, a message can now be transmitted instantly, with little or no cost, to enormous groups of people through email and the Internet. With a very basic Web site, anyone can post a cyberspace billboard that can be viewed by the world. Message boards, online forums, discussion groups, and chat rooms also allow nameless messages; and that anonymous person can spread disinformation and present it with the credibility of a trusted friend. Several corporations have recently felt the sting of anonymous attacks. There is an increasing number of academic victims, including individual faculty members and entire universities. This discussion includes examples of currrent anonymous Web attacks on academia, an overview of related legal issues, and suggestions for protecting individual and institutional reputations on the anonymmous Internet battleground.

Citation

Rakes, G. & Rakes, T. (2002). Disinformation, Academia, and the Web: The Anonymous Battleground. In D. Willis, J. Price & N. Davis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2002--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 511-512). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2019 from .

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