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SITE 1996--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference

1996

Editors

Bernard Robin; Jerry D. Price; Jerry Willis; Dee Anna Willis

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Table of Contents

Number of papers: 274

  1. Project Cape Town: Designing a Teacher Education Case for the Www

    Robert F. McNergney, University of Virginia

    Not available. More

    pp. 103-106

  2. TEACHERS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD EDUCATIONAL COMPUTING IN TAIWAN

    Yuen-kuang Cliff Liao, National Hsinchu Teachers College

    For the past decade, technology has been predicted to be the savior of an educational system in need of reform (National Commission on Excellence in Education, 1983). Many professional... More

    pp. 107-111

  3. Resistance, Access and Power: Technology and Efl Teacher Education in Ukraine

    pp. 112-115

  4. Interpretive Learning Experience S Trategies to Develop Student Problem Solving Opportunities

    John D. Parmley & Dianna L. Parmley, Kansas State University

    Not available. More

    pp. 117-121

  5. Nuestra Tierra

    Karin M. Wiburg & Carmen L. Gonzales, New Mexico State University

    Nuestra Tierra (Spanish for our land/environment) is the name of a two-year university/public school collaborative reasearch project designed to help teachers learn to use multimedia and... More

    pp. 122-126

  6. Developing a Model for Teaching Inservice Social Studies With Computers

    Alex C. Pan, Ruth Koskela & Judson Lyon, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater

    Although social studies is an important subject, social studies instruction is not always exciting and has not received enough attention. The editors of the Learning magazine (1995) state if you... More

    pp. 127-131

  7. Infusion of Technology to Integrate Social Studies and Multicultural L Iterature

    Carolyn C. Ledford & Mercedes S. Tichenor, East Carolina University

    Teacher education programs have a responsibility to teach about, model the use of, and provide experiences with new technologies. As technologies change, teacher education programs must also change... More

    pp. 132-133

  8. Developmental Concerns, Emerging T Echnology Applications, and Social Studies Teacher Training

    Peter H. Martorella, North Carolina State University

    One of the clearest instructional implications of developmental psychology is the desirability of matching instructional tasks to the cognitive capabilities of students. Because the subject matter ... More

    pp. 134-135

  9. Lessons for Technological I Nfusion: Preparing Social Studies Teachers to Use Technology

    Richard Diem, The University of Texas at San Antonio, United States

    pp. 136-137

  10. History, Serial or Cereal: A Multimedia Crunching of Time-Space!

    John Swartz, Sam Houston State University, United States

    The child must see in the box a search from the very beginning. What gets a child interested in the search initially is the challenge of a journey mysterious and before untaken, or before... More

    pp. 138-140

  11. Reading, Language Arts, and Literacy

    p. 141

  12. CD-ROM STORYBOOKS: CHILDRENS’ INTERACTIONS

    Bram Goldstein, Enrique Olivares & William Valmont, University of Arizona

    The inability to read is detrimental to children in today’s modern society as it hinders their intellectual and educa tional growth (de Hirsch, Jansky, & Langford,1966). We need to be able to read ... More

    pp. 142-143

  13. Interfacing Teacher Preparation and Cyberspace: An Innovative a Pproach

    Carine Feyten, Gregory Taylor & Joyce Nutta, Univ. of South Florida

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative Ph.D. program at the University of South Florida that combines second language acquisition/teaching and instructional technology in an effort ... More

    pp. 144-147

  14. The Promise and Potential of Cd-Rom Books

    Kathryn I. Matthew, Louisiana Tech University

    Students of all ages become entranced by CD-ROM books. Their faces light up and their eyes grow large as the computer screen comes to life. Squeals of delight, laughter, and furrowed brows of... More

    pp. 148-151

  15. Implementation and Integration of a Technology-Based Reading Curriculum

    Louise Hay, Drake University

    During the 1994-1995 academic year, Drake University, with the cooperation of the Des Moines Public Schools in Iowa, implemented a technology-based reading curriculum in selected fourth-grade... More

    pp. 152-155

  16. ENHANCING LEARNING IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE WITH MULTIMEDIA

    Paula T. Parson, The U. of Texas at Brownsville; Aileen S. Johnson & The U., Texas Southmost College

    The implementation of whole language literature-based reading programs provides children with broader access to well-known literature in the context of reading instruction. Whole language... More

    pp. 156-158

  17. TECHNOLOGY AND PRESERVICE EDUCATION: MODELS THAT WORK, MODELS THAT DON’T

    Angeline Ferris, Nancy Roberts & Winifred Skolnikoff, Lesley College

    The Lesley College School of Education graduate program includes adults of all ages seeking teaching certification. Virtually none of these students have experienced information technology as an... More

    pp. 159-162

  18. Learning to Plan Effective Language L Essons: A Hypermedia/multimedia M Odule

    Lynn E. Henrichsen & David S. Baker, Brigham Young University

    The crucial process of planning lessons is almost second nature to good, experienced teachers. New and prospective teachers, however, typically need considerable amounts of explicit instruction and... More

    pp. 163-164

  19. From Storybooks to Computers: Preservice Teachers Responses to Electronic Dialogue

    Nancy L. Williams, University of Houston; Kathryn I. Matthew, Louisiana Tech University

    Not available. More

    pp. 165-167

  20. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN CHILDREN’S LEARNING FROM INTERACTIVE B OOKS

    Geoffrey Underwood, University of Nottingham; Jean Underwood, University of Leicester

    There have been extensive claims of the educational benefits of multimedia and few studies of children’s use of interactive books. One of the exceptions is the study by Miller, Blackstock and... More

    pp. 168-171