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Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice

December 2017 Volume 9, Number 1

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Table of Contents

Number of articles: 21

  1. Improving students' perceptions of team effectiveness through an interprofessional community practicum course

    Leslie Hinyard, David Pole & Eileen C. Toomey, Center for Interprofessional Education and Research, United States; N. Bendaly, Kinect, Inc., United States

    In order to accomplish the improved population health component of the Triple Aim, it is necessary to develop students as collaboration-ready to serve in communities with skills to improve... More

    pp. 1-4

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  2. Implementation of an interprofessional error disclosure experience: A multi-institutional collaboration

    Carla Dyer, University of Missouri, United States; Erin Abu-Rish Blakeney, University of Washington, United States; Eric Johnson, University of North Dakota, United States; Sarah Shrader, University of Kansas, United States; Gretchen Gregory, University of Missouri, United States; Andrew Knight, University of North Dakota, United States; Sarah Shannon & Karen McDonough, University of Washington, United States; Les Hall, University of Missouri, United States; Brenda Zierler, University of Washington, United States

    Creation of educational experiences to promote interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice team skills can be resource-intensive and beyond the capacity of many institutions.... More

    pp. 5-11

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  3. Internal medicine nurse shadowing program

    Winnie Chan & Mary Salib, McMaster University, Canada; Shelly-Anne Li, University of Toronto, Canada; Teresa M. Chan, John You, Meghan McBride & Mohamed Panju, Hamilton General Hospital, Canada

    Professional identity formation is a fluid process, which evolves throughout one's medical education. Residency is an ideal time for interprofessional education because as junior physicians, they... More

    pp. 12-16

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  4. Developing student interprofessional competence through a support group assignment

    Shannon Wall Mangum, Louisiana State University Health – New Orleans, United States; Jessica L. Johnson, Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy, United States; Tina Patel Gunaldo & Erica Casanova, Louisiana State University Health – New Orleans, United States; Alaina DeKerlegand, Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy, United States

    Support groups provide individuals the opportunity to interact and build a network of support for the betterment of health. A support group assignment was developed and integrated into an... More

    pp. 17-20

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  5. Interprofessional collaborative practice through an adult medicine based simulation

    Jon P. Wietholter, West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, United States; Carl Grey, West Virginia University School of Medicine, United States; Catessa Howard & Brynn N. Johnson, West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, United States; Racheal Sween & Aletha E. Rowlands, West Virginia University School of Nursing, United States

    There is limited data on the effect of interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) in clinical settings with fully trained, licensed medical professionals.Practicing nurses, physicians, and... More

    pp. 21-26

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  6. A demonstration study of collaboration in primary care: Insights from physicians and psychologists

    E. Farmanova, University of Toronto, Canada; J. Grenier, The Montfort Hospital Research Institute, Canada; M.-H. Chomienne, W. Hogg & P. Ritchie, University of Ottawa, Canada

    Increasing recognition of the complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors influencing health and of the inefficiencies in the delivery of mental health services in primary care emphasize the need ... More

    pp. 27-33

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  7. Challenges and successes in an integrated behavioral complex care clinic

    Carole K. Ivey, School of Allied Health Professions, United States; Jodi M. Winship & Rebecca S. Etz, School of Medicine, United States

    Mental health and substance abuse disorders occur with other medical problems at a higher rate, resulting in increased costs and higher morbidity and mortality rates. Integrating behavioral health ... More

    pp. 34-40

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  8. Comparing change in perceived achievement of students in an interprofessional class: The effectiveness of participatory versus direct instruction

    John F.K. Ekpe, David R. Moore, John W. McCarthy & Jeffrey J. DiGiovanni, Ohio University, United States

    pp. 41-50

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  9. Provider attitudes and practice of recommended guidelines to reduce readmissions among low income minority patients

    Ugochi Ohuabunwa, Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, United States; Seema Shah, Institute for Family Health, United States; Queenie Jordan, Kristen Johnson & Elizabeth Avent, Senior Services Division, United States; Jonathan Flacker, Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, United States

    In recognition of the contributory role of patient, provider, and systems related factors to failure in transitions of care, recommendations have been made by healthcare organizations regarding... More

    pp. 51-57

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  10. Professional training and the case for interprofessional education for kinesiologists

    Daniel Santa Mina, Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Canada; Steven L. Fischer, Department of Kinesiology, Canada

    pp. 58-60

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  11. Interprofessional education with ultrasound simulation: Diabetes and pregnancy

    Sushila Arya, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, United States; Zuber D. Mulla & Sanja Kupesic Plavsic, Center for Advanced Teaching and Assessment in Clinical Simulation (ATACS), United States

    Interprofessional education (IPE) workshop on “Diabetes and pregnancy” was conducted to improve knowledge and effective communication skills required to address important clinical issues in the... More

    pp. 61-65

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  12. Interprofessional collaboration among helping professions: Experiences with holistic client care

    Chaniece Winfield, Narketta M. Sparkman-Key & Anthony Vajda

    This study explores interprofessional collaboration for holistic client care within the helping disciplines. Specifically, the experiences of behavioral health, nursing, dental hygiene, social work... More

    pp. 66-73

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  13. Service learning in developing countries: Student outcomes including personal successes, seeing the world in new ways, and developing as health professionals

    Emma Crawford, Anne-Maree Caine, Lucy Hunter, Anne E. Hill, Allison Mandrusiak, Lisa Anemaat, Ruth Dunwoodie, Amy Fagan & Teresa Quinlan

    Service learning in developing countries (SLID) can develop students' skills such as teamwork, cultural responsiveness, ethical practice, and professional skills. However most research has been... More

    pp. 74-81

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  14. Impact of Interprofessional Falls Risk Assessment Program on Student Perceptions of Other Healthcare Professionals

    Laura A. Terreri & Gregory G. Homish, School of Public Health and Health Professions, United States; Robert G. Wahler & Peter M. Brody, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, United States; Patricia J. Ohtake, School of Public Health and Health Professions, United States

    Fall prevention programs with exercise interventions and medication reviews improve short-term function for community-dwelling older adults with risk of falls. We describe an Interprofessional... More

    pp. 82-85

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  15. Reducing ER use through a trainee-designed, interprofessional care group for high-utilizing chronically ill patients: A pilot program

    Linnaea Schuttner, Department of Internal Medicine-Pediatrics, United States; Zhenyu Zhang, Department of Biostatistics, United States; Alice Kuo, Department of Internal Medicine-Pediatrics, United States

    Healthcare utilization is skewed to a subset of high-need, high-use patients, but optimal models of care are not known.To reduce emergency room (ER) use and hospital readmissions, trainees designed... More

    pp. 86-90

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  16. Impact of an interprofessional population health course and clinical immersion experience: Students and practice outcomes

    Meg Zomorodi, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, United States; Lisa de Saxe Zerden, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Social Work, United States; Betty Nance-Floyd, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, United States; Lorraine Alexander & Rachel Wilfert, NC Institute for Public Health, United States; Julie Byerley, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, United States

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the impact of an interprofessional (IP) population health course and accompanying clinical immersion experience. Outcomes related to IP learning, team-based... More

    pp. 91-94

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  17. A comparison between urban academic health care center and rural community faculty members in approaches to IPE

    L.N. Woltenberg, J.A. Ballard, J.C. Norton & J.D. Riddle

    The objective of this study is to compare attitudes and approaches to interprofessional education (IPE) between urban and rural faculty and includes description of barriers for teaching... More

    pp. 95-98

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  18. Project SARET: An interprofessional education (IPE) lens examines substance use disorders research education for health professional students

    Madeline A. Naegle, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, United States; Kathleen Hanley & Marc N. Gourevitch, NYU School of Medicine, United States; Ellen Tuchman, NYU Silver School of Social Work, United States; Frederick G. More, NYU College of Dentistry, United States; Sewit Bereket, NYU School of Medicine, United States

    The NIDA funded Substance Abuse Education, Research and Training (SARET) Program addresses the compelling need for health professionals prepared to engage in substance use disorders (SUD) research.... More

    pp. 99-103

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  19. From knowing silence to curious engagement: The role of general practitioners to discuss and refer to complementary and alternative medicine

    Kate Roberts, Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, New Zealand; Jing-Bao Nie, Bioethics Centre, New Zealand; Tony Dowell, Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, New Zealand

    In many OECD countries up to half of the population uses complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). CAM refers to the diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are... More

    pp. 104-107

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  20. Identification of interprofessional practice and application to achieve patient outcomes of health care providers in the acute care setting

    Beth Bright, Brittany Austin, Chelsey Garn, Jillian Glass & Shelby Sample

    Recent health care changes urge for the implementation of interprofessional practice to improve quality of patient care.The study sought to determine the current level of workforce readiness for... More

    pp. 108-114

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